“Lafayette – the Abolitionist – Disdained Slavery…”

Wow…  There is a major parallel between the Lafayette shooting and the date 23 July in history…
Check it out…

On 23 July 1863 the Confederate Army had a major victory against Union Forces at Manassas…


The Battle of Manassas Gap, also known as the Battle of Wapping Heights, took place on July 23, 1863, in Warren County, Virginia, at the conclusion of General Robert E. Lee‘s retreat back to Virginia in the final days of the Gettysburg Campaign of the American Civil War. Union forces attempted to force passage across the Blue Ridge Mountains and attack the Confederate rear as it formed a defensive position in the upper Shenandoah Valley. Despite successfully forcing the passage at Manassas Gap, the Union force was unable to do so before Lee retreated further up the valley to safety, resulting in an inconclusive battle.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Manassas_Gap
http://www.fauquiercivilwar.com/battlefields_gettysburg.html#manassasgap

Wow…

Culturallyconscious's Weblog

Wow…

The city of Lafayette La. is named after French General Marquis de Lafayette who fought with America in the revolutionary war…  General Lafayette helped write the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, with the assistance of Thomas Jefferson, which had great similarities to our constitution and bill of rights…  Lafayette disdained Slavery…  Lafayette was an abolitionist…  http://rmc.library.cornell.edu/lafayette/exhibition/english/abolitionist/
General Lafayette pitched a plan to General George Washington to end slavery in the final days of the American Revolution…   http://www.mountvernon.org/research-collections/digital-encyclopedia/article/marquis-de-lafayettes-plan-for-slavery/

Eventually he (Lafayette, Marquis de) landed near Charleston, South Carolina, June 13, 1777, and when the leaders learned of his mission they welcomed him very hospitably… Later in the summer he (Lafayette, Marquis de) came to Philadelphia and the Congress welcomed him as he (Lafayette, Marquis de) came to serve without pay and also as a volunteer…  http://www.ushistory.org/valleyforge/served/lafayette.html

In 1823, the Louisiana legislature divided…

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